Sunday, June 26, 2016

"Of 40 veterans who helped with the cleanup who The New York Times identified, 21 had cancer. Nine had died from it."



From a terrifying report in The New York Times on a 1966 hydrogen bomb accident in Spain, and the appalling behavior afterwards by the U.S. government:

If the men could prove they were harmed by radiation, they would have all costs for their associated medical care covered and would get a modest disability pension. But proof from a secret mission to clean up an invisible poison decades ago has proved elusive. So each time the men apply, the Air Force says they were not harmed and the department hands out denials.

“First they denied I was even there, then they denied there was any radiation,” said Ronald R. Howell, 71, who recently had a brain tumor removed. “I submit a claim, and they deny. I submit appeal, and they deny. Now I’m all out of appeals.” He sighed, then continued. “Pretty soon, we’ll all be dead and they will have succeeded at covering this whole thing up.”

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