Monday, August 29, 2016

"In the Dark," a new podcast about the botched investigation of the abduction of Jacob Wetterling



From American Public Media and investigative reporter Madeleine Baran, a new podcast:

In the dark, before moonrise on Oct. 22, 1989, three boys rode home on bikes and a scooter after renting a video of The Naked Gun at a Tom Thumb store in St. Joseph, Minn. Carrying a flashlight and reflective gear, they drifted along a dead-end road that connected a cul-de-sac of houses to town, their biggest concern that they might be hit by a car.

On a deserted stretch, near a winding farm driveway, a man dressed in black with his face covered, perhaps by pantyhose, stepped into the road with a gun. In a voice that sounded like he had a cold, he forced the boys to the ground in a ditch. He asked each of them their ages and grabbed one in the crotch. The man told two of the boys to run toward the nearby woods without looking back, which they did. And then he vanished, virtually without a trace, with the third boy, 11-year-old Jacob Wetterling.

Twenty-seven years later, neither the abductor nor Jacob has been found. What happened after the boys ran for the woods remains a mystery, as fathomless as the black sky that night.

"When the lynching trial in Greenville came to its end, late in May, it was full summer there, and the huge, pale bush roses that grow around the porches were a little dusty."


This riveting 1947 article in The New Yorker by Rebecca West, about a lynching trial in South Carolina, is not what you might expect.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Jambalaya, by Reina del Cid



Here's the best version of an old Hank Williams song I've heard in a long time, by Minnesota's own Reina del Cid, with some inspired flat-picking by Toni Lindren. (When you've finished listening, go to Bandcamp and buy their latest album, The Cooling.)

The University of Kentucky will sue its own student newspaper for reporting on a sexual assault case

A badge of honor.

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

It's rebranding time in Tisdale, Saskatchewan



According to the CBC, "Officials said 57 per cent of respondents were in favour of rebranding, while 36 per cent opposed changing the slogan."